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COLLEGE 



Vol. 3. No. 28. 



AEW5 



WELLESLEY, MASS., WEDNESDAY, MAY ,11, 1904. 




Price, 5 Cents 



MAY DAY. 

The glad spring sunshine ushered in a 
perfect May day. Early in the morning 
the Seniors washed the Backwoodsman, — 
the statue which stands on the south porch 
of College Hall, — singing meanwhile 
We are the Seniors, 

Seniors are we, 
Washing the Woodsman 
Right merrily. 
Then they decorated the statues about 
the building. Some of those were draped 
in classic simplicity, while others, with 
gaily flaunted parasols, assumed a 
coquettish air. Stretched across the 
Centre was a broad band of violet 
bun-ting- w-kh -the- -Senior-class- numerals 
upon it. 

At eight o'clock these "grave and rever- 
end Seniors" went forth in cap and gown 
for the annual hoop-rolling. There was an 
animated scene about the Circle as the 
girls sped round and round and then down 
the hill to chapel. There, beneath a 
hooped archway, the under classes passed 
in to the brief morning service, where, for a 
few minutes, the revels were forgotten. On 
the return to College Hall, the Circle was 
again the scene of much merriment. Rings 
of laughing girls, Seniors and Sophomores, 
circled about, singing and cheering. The 
Seniors grouped themselves together and 
sang, among others, this May day song: 
"On the first day of May 
When we Seniors feel gay 
We return to the pranks of our childhood 
And we roll our hoops round 
O'er the green and the ground, 
While we play like the fairies in wildwood. 
"In the light early morn 
We all dignity scorn. 
Tho' we're garbed in our gowns academic 
With our tassels and sleeves, 
All afloat in the breeze, 
We forget all our studies polemic. " 

In the afternoon, however, the whole 
college participated in the celebration. 
The side hill was filled with interested spec- 
tators, and below, on the campus, dainty 
little girls, sturdy sailor boys, youthful 
venders and pert little French maids all 



frolicked together, danced to the music of 
the hurdy-gurdy, rolled hoops, played ball 
and jumped rope. The miniature booth 
by the pines was a popular center. The 
ice-cream and candy were quickly sold, and 
twenty-five dollars was cleared for the Sil- 
ver Bay fund. The most picturesque 
sight was the unwinding of the May-pole 
and the crowning of the queen of the May. 
It was a delightful study in color, the 
winding streamers of blue, red and yellow 
and green; the ever changing groups of 
gaily dressed children, and for a background 
the green campus and the dark trees be- 
yond. The Senior president crowned 
Miss Besse, the Freshman president, with 
a dainty wreath. Even the Faculty, 
throwing off their weight of responsibility, 
joined in the revels. For once, all mem- 
bers of the College, forgetting age and class 
distinctions, became children at play. 
Then, as the shadows lengthened on the 
hill slope, little bands of tired boys and 
girls, and "grown-ups" weary of their 
games, went slowly home. 

After dinner the girls wended their way 
to the chapel steps to close the day in song. 
The class songs were sung and "Alma 
Mater" and " 'Neath the Oaks." With 
the Wellesley cheer the 1904 May Day was 
ended. E. L. M., 1906. 



Lcs Romanesques. 

A French play, while not a new feature 
at. Wellesley, is still rare enough to deserve 
especial notice; and the play given this 
year by L' Alliance Francaise demands 
attention from an absolute standpoint. 
It was a pleasure to see that there was a 
number of students from Walnut Hill and 
Dana Hall present, showing their interest 
in the French work; but it must be re- 
gretted that there were not more College 
girls, especially students of French, there 
to show their interest in the play and their 
loyalty to the Department. 

The play given was Edmund Rostand's, 
"Les Romanesques'Vhich the girls present- 
ed with much charm and spirit. Miss Louise 
Curtis as Sylvette, the young girl fresh 
from boarding-school and overflowing with 



romantic ideas, caught the French sou- 
plesse very well. She carried off her part 
with much grace and charm. The hero, 
Miss Sarah Anderson, used her voice with 
good control, and put into it the passion 
of the lover. She kept always before us 
the dreaming, romantic youth. 

The bourgeois fathers were delightful. 
Miss Ethel Folger, le pere de Percinet, 
and Miss Anna Hamlin, le pere de Sylvette, 
spent their time in plotting and planning 
for their children's marriage. By their 
schemes, things went smoothly, in fact, 
so smoothly that the fathers, for a bit of 
excitement revealed the plot to Sylvette, 
and from that arose the complications. 

Miss Florence Cook made a clashing 
abductor and villian. Le jardinicr, per- 
sonages muets, spadassins, musiciens, un 
notaire and even le mur, were interesting. 
The costuming was very attractive; and 
neither the fact that we suspected the dra- 
matic committee had improved it slightly, 
nor our ignorance concerning the styles of 
the time of Louis Ouatorze, detracted from 
our appreciation of it. 

I. 'Alliance Francaise, and especially its 
members who took part, are to be congrat- 
ulated on the success of the play. It 
showed work spent with good results, for 
aside from the acting, the parts had been 
exceedingly well memorized, and the 
French accent was very good. We hope 
that the Society may be encouraged to 
give another play next year. 

C. B. &., 1006. 

The Harvard-Princeton Debate. 

The tenth annual debate between Har- 
vard and Princeton was held on Friday 
evening. May 6th, at Saunders Theatre, 
Cambridge. "The question was Resolved: 
"That laws be passed compelling the man- 
agement of a business undertaking which 
secures control of an industry _ to sell its 
product at reasonable rates without dis- 
crimination." Princeton had the affirm- 
ative side. The debate was intensely in- 
teresting, but a trifle one-sided, as the Har- 
vard men showed much more maturity in 
their work. This was easily accounted 
for, as the men on the Princeton team 
were all untried debaters. Mr. McCor- 
mick gave the most promise of power. 
Of the Harvard team, Mr. Wagner, a sec- 
ond year law student, was prominent for 
his fine, deliberate, telling work. Mr. 
Rabenold. while he showed some fiery 
eloquence, lacked the moderation and 
depth of thought which characterized the 
other speakers. No surprise was felt 
when the judges gave their decision in 
favor of Harvard. C. S. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College IRews. 

Press of n. A. Lindscy & Co.. Boston. 

Published weekly. Subscription price, 76 cents 
a year to resilient subscribers; $1.00 per year to 
non-resident subscribers. 

All advertising communications should be sent 
to Miss C. \V. Kogers. Wellesley Inn, Wellesley. 

All business correspondence should be ad- 
dressed to ANNIE V. LUFF, BusineSB Manager 
College News. 

All subscriptions should be sent to Cora L. 
Butler. 



Editor-in-Chief, Mary Jessie Gidley, I 906 

Associate Editor, Sadie M. Samuel, I906 

Literary Editors, 

■ d Hawkridge. I 906 Mary Lee Cadwell, IS 

Alumnaa Editor, Roxana H. Vivian, I 894 

Managing Editors, 

Annie V. Luff, I 904 

.. Butler, I 904 Edith Fox, I 904 



"Entered as second class matter November 12. 
1903, at the post office at Wellesley, Mass., under 
the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879. 



" It is easy in the world to live after the 
world's opinion; it is easy in solitude to 
live after our own ; but the great man is he 
who in the midst of the crowd keeps with 
perfect sweetness the independence of soli- 
tude. " If Emerson were here in College 
looking on at the flurry and rush of life, he 
would more than ever be impressed by the 
need of these words. It is very natural to 
be carried along by the sweep of events, to 
hurry because every one else is hurrying. 
It is the usual thing to plunge headlong into 
dramatics, athletics and clubs; it becomes 
very easy to move in a crowd of people all 
day long. Granted enough energy we can 
all play in the village, make peppermints, 
attend meetings and concerts, take at least 
one trip to Boston a week, crowd in fifteen 
hours of recitation, and laboratory periods 
indefinite, and rush through several papers 
at all hours of the day and night. 

On the other hand it is easy to drop out 
of the "hurly-burly" altogether. There 
are those who attend to their work faith- 
fully, but to whom college interests and 
college spirit mean little. They are the 
dwellers-apart, who are missing the golden 
opportunities surrounding them on every 
side. They are not alone the so-called 
"grinds," but all those whose pleasure 
lies outside the College. 

As always, it is hardest to strike a happy 



It's a F OWNE3' 

That's all you 
need to know about 
a glove 



SPECTACLES 

and EYEGLASSES. 



In our enlarged quarters we are better pre- 
pared than ever to furnish you with the very 
best Optical Goods, at our usual moderate 
prices. We solicit a comparison of our goods 
and prices. 

Pinkham «& Smith, 

The Back Bay Opticians, 
288 Boylston Street, Boston. 



medium. To accomplish our acadernic 
work, to develop along as many side lines 
as possible, to know the girls, to keep up 
with the College, and at the same time 
"to keep with perfect sweetness the inde- 
pendence of solitude," — there comes the 
rub. The current is so strong that we 
seem to be either swept along with it or 
left on the shore contemplating it. At 
every turn of the corridor we meet those 
beings possessed with a mania for "doing 
things," who plan every hour in the day 
for a week ahead, It is well nigh im- 
possible to get out of college all that can 
be gained from it and at the same time 
to lead an individual life. Yet the girl 
who attends faithfully to her work and 
who enters into other things only in so far 
as strength permits and tastes dictate, 
will gain the most. That girl who main- 
tains her poise in the midst of college 
activity, will be the best eqttipped in a 
larger sphere. A little time spent alone, 
fewer "things" attempted, and. above 
all, a gentler pace, will go a long way 
towards putting a mite of "sweetness" 
into our lives. 




THE WELLESLEY INN 

Board for July, 
August and 
September. _->^ 



SILKS 

DRESS SILKS AND DECORATIVE SII.KS 

WOOLS 

FOR GOWNS AND BLOUSES 

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373 Boylston St., Boston, Mass. 



MISS McCHARLES, 

Corner Boylston and Berkeley. 

229 Berkeley Street, Boston, Mass. 

GOWNS FOR COLLEGE WEAR. 

Reasonable Prices. 



PHOTOS 

In Platinum, Carbon, Carbonette. Photog- 
rapher to Wellesley, '94, '95 and '03. 

THE HEARN STUDIO, 

C W- Hearn, 349 Boylston St , Boston. 
Personal attention to all sittings. 



DOWSLEY & LAFFEE, 
High Class Hillinery, 

168 Tremont St., Boston, Mass. 
Discount to Wellesley Students and Faculty. 



SAVES HOSIERY 




HOSE 
SUPPORTER 



If your Dealer does not sell you this 
Supporter he does not sell the Best 

Every Clasp has the nan 
Stamped on the Metal Loop* 
GEORGE FROST CO., Makers, Boston, Mass. 




COLL E O E N E W S 



COLLEGE CALENDAR. 

May 10, 8 P.M., Chemistry Building lecturebj Mrs Huntington, 
President of the Animal Rescue League Eoi n idenl oi 
Wellesley village. Subject "Care and Treatment oi the 
Horse," to be illustrated by stereopticon views. 

May ii, 1.15 I'M. I .. R. 1 , Junior Class meeting for election of 
Senior Presidenl 

\l.i\ 1 ■ 1 >o P.M., L. R. j, lecture by Professor Emerton oi 
Harvard. Subject: "History of Mediaeval Europe." 

M.i\ 1.', 7.^0 P.M., mid-week prayer meeting of the Chri tian 
Association Address by Mr. Wright, Secretary of the 
Yale Young Men's Christian Association. 

May i.|, 3.20 P.M., in College Hall chapel, lecture bj Mrs. Lucia 
Ames Mead. Subject: "International Peace." 

May 1. 1, -| to (>, I'.M.. in ihc Students' Parlor, reception cjven 
by the Christian Association to the Freshman class. 

May 14, 7.^0 to 9.30 P.M., at the Barn, Studio reception given 
by the Tan Zeta Epsilon Society. 

May 15, 11 A.M., services in Houghton Memorial chapel. Ser- 
mon by President Eaton of Beloit College. 
7 P.M., vespers, Address by President Eaton. 

May id. 7. .50 P.M., in College Hall chapel, lecture by Prof. 
G. II. Parker of Harvard. Subject: "Evolution of the Sense 
of 1 [earing. " 



COLLEGE NOTES. 



Miss Mary W. Dewson, President of the class of 1S97, will speak 
before the Economics Club, Thursday evening, May 12th, at 
S P.M.. on her work in connection with the State Industrial 
School for girls. 

The architects' plans showing the arrangement of rooms in 
Poineroy Hall, the new dormitory, now btiilding, are hung be- 
neath the picture of the building in College Hall Centre. 

On Wednesday, May 4th, Dr. Bigelow of the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology, lectured before the advanced students 
in Philosophical Zoology. His subject was "Variation." 

The Christian Association prayer meeting. Thursday, May 5, 
was led by Miss Eleanor Monroe, who chose as her subject: "Be 
ye steadfast, " 

At a meeting of the class of 1905. Thursday, May 11, Miss 
Lucy Eisenberg was elected Senior member of the Executive 
Board of the Student Government Association. At the same 
meeting Miss Ruth Haulenbeek was elected to the Literary 
Board of the Legenda to fill the vacancy caused by the resig- 
nation of Miss Hibbard, and Miss Elizabeth Camp was elected 
Assistant Business Manager of the Wellesley Magazine to fill 
the vacancy caused by the resignation of Miss Sillcox. 

Miss Nina Madeline Hill, 1904, announced her engagement to 
Mr. Howard Maxwell Beverley of Ayer, Mass., at a dinner, Tues- 
day evening, May 3. 

Miss Daphne Crane and Miss Sibyl Burton entertained the 
cast of the Freshman play, and Miss More, 1904, and Miss 
Daniels, 1905, at dinner at the Inn, Monday evening, May 2. 

Miss Eva Cummings, 1906, has left College because of trouble 
with her eyes. 

Mr. George W. Kramer, father of Miss Estelle Kramer, 1904, 
died at his home in Denver, Colorado, on Thursday, May 4. 

Miss Frances H Warren, 1903, is visiting at the College. 

THE BAILEY, BANKS & 
BIDDLE COHPANY, 

Designers and Manufacturers of 
Glass Pins Badges 

Stick: Pins Class Rings 

Class Stationery 

Designs and estimates of cost mailed on request. No obligation 
is incurred. 

PHILADELPHIA 



NEW STYLES IN 

SHOES FOR SPRING 

NOW READY. 

■ $3.00 and $3.50 Shoes are always the newesi 

in design and are no) excelled in st j le <t wearing qualities 

by any si f si hi i hi r price, 



Thayer, Rogers & Norton, 

144 Tremont Street, Boston. 




The Standard Highway of Travel Between New 
Fngland and the St. Louis Exposition 
[a the Boston & Albany ami New York 
Central. Deseriplive folder containing 
maps, rates, ete., will be mailed on appli- 
cation. 

A. S. I1AINSOIN, 

General Passenger Agent. 



ADOLPH E. LEWIS, 

Ladies' Tailor and Habit Maker, 

R,iding Habits for Cross and Side Saddle a Specialty. 

231 Washington Street, 
Harvard Square. BROOKLINE, MASS. 

TELEPHONE 2GS-2 BROOKLINE. 

Near Clasen Riding Scliool. 



WELLESLEY 
DISCOUNT AT 



Butterfield's Bookshop 



59 BROMFIELD 
ST.. BOSTON 



BASEMENT of Paddock Building. 



The stock is one that has been carefully selected by Mr. Butterfield, 
and represents all that is best in recent literature, and among the stock are 
many rare old volumes that will appeal to booklovers. The location is 
convenient, and the quiet, cheerful tone of the shop lends a charm to the 
pleasure of bookbuying.— Boston Courier. Send for Book List. 



SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW CO. 

JEWELERS AND SILVERSMITHS, BOSTON 

FINE STATIONERY, UMBRELLAS, PARASOLS. 
WEDDING GIFTS. 
OFFICIAL MAKERS OF THE WELLESLEY SEAL PINS. 
FINE JEWELRY REPAIRING. 



Every Requisite for a 

JDatntE Xuncb 

at 

COBB, BATES & YERXA CO., 

55 to 61 Summer Street, 

( Only one block from Washington St.) 



COLLEGE NEWS 



The Christian Association Elections. 



The formal ballot for the officers of the Christian Association 
for 1904-1905 resulted as follows: 
President, Mabel Emerson. 
Vice-President. Sally Reed. 
Corresponding Secretary, Olive Green. 
Treasurer, Clara Griffin. 

Chairman General Aid Committee, Faith Sturtevant. 
Chairman Missionary Committee, Miss Kendrick. 
Chairman Religious Meetings, Miss Tufts. 
Chairman Bible Study Committee, Emma Miller. 
Chairman Social Committee, Connie Guion. 
Chairman, Mission Study Committee, Lottie Hartwell. 1 
Recording Secretary, Emma Bixby. 



CROSS-COUNTRY WALKING. 



Cross Country Walking bids fair to be extremely popular, 
if we may predict from the numbers which attended the meeting 
called by Miss Hill to discuss making it an organized sport. 
Thirty people were present, and after a consideration of various 
plans, Miss Parker and Miss Walmsley, 1906, and Miss Herrick, 
1907, were appointed as a committee to draw up a constitution. 
It was decided to wait until fall before starting the cross-country 
tramps, since it was considered more desirable to get the club 
first into thoroughly good working order. 

Under the proposed constitution the new organization will be 
called the Wellesley College Cross Country Club, and will be 
open to all members of the College, subject to their physical fit- 
ness. The members will be placed in three separate squads, 
each division being under the supervision of a manager. The 
sqtiads will be made on the basis of strength and endurance, 
the first class being for those who are enthusiastic pedestrians, 
the second for those who are physically sound, but have not the 
enduring qualities of the first class, and the third for those who 
enter the club for the purpose of improving their health. Two 
short walks will be required during the week, varying from 
half an hour to an hour according to the class of the member, 
and on Mondays the squads will meet and take walks of from 
eight to fifteen miles. Maps and records will be made of these 
tramps, and inserted in the club journal. It will be seen that 
this organization is planned with a view to developing the social 
side of Athletics, since it makes less exacting demands than do 
all other, sports except golf and tennis, and offers an opportunity 
to girls who have too little time or strength to devote to a sys- 
tematic sport. 



NORTHFIELD CONFERENCE. 



Plans for the eleventh session of the Young Women's Con- 
ference, which meets at East Northfield, Mass., July 12-19, are 
fast nearing completion. 

Its purpose, as heretofore, remains the same, — the develop- 
ment of the Christian life among young women, and the awaken- 
ing of an interest in Bible Study, and in practical methods of 
church work; but its scope is enlarged, and is now designed to 
include all young women, without reference to any one religious 
organization or class of students. 

The following platform speakers are promised- for the audito- 
rium meetings: 

Rev. G. Campbell Morgan, Mr. W. R. Moody, Mr. Robert E. 
Speer, Rev. Wilton Merle Smith, Dr. J. R. Miller. 

All communications concerning the Conference may be ad_ 
dressed to the Secretary, East Northfield, Mass. 

A fuller notice of the speakers and of the sub-conferences and 
classes may be found on the Christian Association bulletin-board. 



STICKNEY & SMITH, 

157 Tremont Street, Boston, 

Allow 10 per cent, discount to 
Teachers and Pupils of Welles- 
ley College on 

Ladies' Costumes, 
Street, Walking Suits, 
Skirts and Garments 

of All Kinds, 

Waists and Furs, 

(OUR ONLY STORE.) 



Framing, Glass and all Passepartout Materials. 
Mounts and tinted papers in sheets and cut to 
size. Enlarging and Locket Photos. Jt Jt ^t ^t 

Q. L. Abell, Photographer, 

WELLESLEY, MASS. 

Theatrical Wigs and Make-up, 

M. G. SLATTERY, 

220 Tremont Street, Boston. 

Near Touraine, Opp. Majestic Theatre. 
WIGS, BEARDS, CURLS, To rent for Private Theatricals 

MOUSTACHES, Masquerades, Carnivals. 

Grease Paints, Eye Pencils, Powders, Rouges, Etc. 



MOCHA AND JAVA COFFEE, 
1 lb. and 2 lb Cans. 



PREFERRED STOCK 

The Highest Grade Coffee. 

MARTIN L. HALL& CO., BOSTON 



STUHTEVflflT 8t HflLtEY, 

Beef and Supply Co., 

38 and 40 Paneuil Hall Market, 
Tel. 933 Richmond. BOSTON. 



BROOKLINE RIDING ACADEMY 

VILLAGE SQUARE, BSOOELINE. 

Telephone 1270 Brookline. 



TWO RUNGS, 

ONE OPEN ONE CLOSED 

Closed Ring Again Enlarged 25 feet. 

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Ladies taught either on Cross Saddle or 

Side Saddle, First elass saddle horses to let. 

Finest aeeonimodutiun lor boarding 

horses. Filteeu minutes troni l'aik Square. 

Boston. 

H. CLASEN. 
Special IRatee for Colleges, Scbools 
ant* leacbers. 




COLLEGE NEWS 



FREE PRESS. 



There seems !<> bean unfortunate and mosl unhappil) cor 
ceived idea abroad in various college circles which leads many oi 
our number erroneouslj i" imagine thai the pigeon holes and 
crannies of the Editor's desk are crammed with superfluous and 
even forgotten Pree Press manuscripts, contributed lis 
scores a( enthusiastic supporters of the Collegi weekly, This 
may seem to souk- a rather painfully exaggerated statement, 
bu1 the work oi a few weeks has broughl us to this conclusion, 
When we mention to some kindly disposed friend (whom wi 

know to be in touch with a subjeel of interest to the coll a1 

large) the fact that a word from her would not lie out of place, 
the answer is almost always. "01 I should lie glad to write a 
Free Press. Hut I thought the column was crowded already. 
And what shalll write about .' " 

Disillusions are sometimes painful, sometimes of educational 
value. We should hesitate to mention which of the two sensa- 
tions we have experienced. As to the superfluity, no! Some 
one will say, " So many weeks agi i I handed in a Free Press which 
never appeared in the News. " We have found one or two such 
papers scattered promiscuously about the Magazine Office, 

splendid articles, pertinent, interesting — but they have not 
been given directly into our hands but left in inconspicuous 
places. 'Phe person who finds this copy a week or so after it 
should have "raced the columns of the News, is no less disap- 
pointed than is the author herself. There is this unfortunate 
side to Free Press — the best paragraphs are often those which 
will not "keep." 

The Free Press is not the sphere of the blue pencil and the 
shears. It is the one column of our paper which is open without 
restraint or mental reservation for the discussion by members of 
the Faculty or student body of any subject of general or local in- 
terest. Does silence mean that the Free Press is not desired? 
Or is it not rather that lingering suspicion of the shadow of the 
waste paper basket, the unsparing shears, the full-to-overflowing 
pigeon holes ! The Editor does not think that it is quite carrying 
ovit the purpose of Free Press to solicit and plead for articles, on 
bended knee, as it were. What is your opinion ? 

Free Press Editor. 

When we, the student-body, obtained self-government, we 
doubtless made a marked advance in the eyes of the world at 
large, — in so far as the world at large looks at Wellesley, — and 
also in our self respect; but we did not make any considerable 
progress in the forming of a closer relation between Faculty and 
Students. At present, the business transacted by the students 
and reported to a committee of the Faculty reaches the Faculty 
in cold, condensed form. They review it; and, after an analysis, 
without sufficient knowledge of our more personal attitude, they 
give or withhold their sanction. As a way, therefore, of bring- 
ing the two main divisions of our miniature republic into closer 
union, the writer would suggest that the students open their 
meetings to the Faculty as hearers. By this act. our independ- 
ence would be in no wise threatened; our problems, our thoughts 
and judgments would be far more vital to that other body and 
one more chain would exist between us. This proposition needs 
and calls for the expressed opinions of members of both parties, 
in the Free Press columns, in order that those who were foremost 
in procuring our present government and are still interested in 
its welfare mav give us their counsel in so important a question. 

F. R., too;. 



Land of the Mid= 
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equal 

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Made from sugar-cured 
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dish. 

It may be bought at 
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but be sure you see 
on the can THE 
LITTLE RED 
DEVIL. 

Our book contains a lot of unique and practical receipts. We will 
send it free. WM. UNDERWOOD & CO., Boston, Mass., U. S. A. 




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Pullman Palace or Sleeping Cars on all through lines. For tick- 
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Restaurant for Ladies. Entrance on Boylston Street. 
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COLLEGE NEWS 



A. SHUMAN & CO., Boston 

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AGENT FOR 

Lewando's Dye House, 
Mrs. H. E. Currier's, 

Grove Street, Wellesley. 

Dr. Henry's Dental Office 

will be removed from Shat- 
tuck's Building to the New 
Block (Taylor's), in Welles- 
ley Square, about May 1, '04. 

SMITH BROTHERS, 

Butter, Cheese & Eggs, 

2 and 4 New Faneuil Hall 
Market, 
BOSTON, MASS. 
Sole Receivers of Randolph Cream- 
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MARY L. MORAN, 
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Shaw Building, Wellesley, Mass. 
latest pastyiops, 

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Costume Parlors, 

2 Boylston Place, Boston 

Costumes tor private theatricals 
and Costume parties. 

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PHARMACISTS, 

Shattuck Building, Wellesley, Mass. 

"Tom" Griffin, l ' nd w e e n ll s e t s L E y 

Carriages at Station on arrival of all trains. 

Reliable Horses and Carriages To Let. 

Personal Attention to all orders 
for evening trains. Order box at 
North Door of College Hall. 

BAGGAGE TBANSFEBBKD. 

TELEPHONE 101-8. 



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Stalls 46 & 48 Faneuil Hall 

Market, 

BOSTON. 

F. DIEHL & SON, 

Dealers in 

Coal, Wood, Hay & Grain, 

Wellesley, Mass. 
Telephone No, 16-4 



THE PARLIAMENT OF FOOLS. 



GERMAN AS SHE IS TRANSLATED. 

It was midway in summer, but nevertheless yet the down- 
streaming rain he rained, and the fiercely lashing hail moreover 
he beat the head of the red-cheeked love-worthy fisher-maid 
down, while it sat on the much bemoved sea and wished also that 
come he, the strong- limbed fishing out on the deep in the tiny 
skiff lover should, but also yet he came not and yet always more- 
over her thoughts went over to him in a friendly way during 
which the tears streamed the cheeks along and with anguished 
befilled voice she held a speech with herself, and called, "He is to 
me nevertheless my heart's treasure — that only understands it- 
self. I am also as a low roselet on the heather and he as the love- 
ly life and strength-giving sun which pours also downward her 
rays over the earth as a whole," and by this also felt she moreover 
in a friendly manner a pressed kiss on the lips, and she looked up- 
ward against the Heaven and saw the love-befilled eyes of him 
gazing deep into those of hers and the arms accordingly slun;; 
themselves moreover about the waist and so they sat near one an- 
other and chatted also in a friendly way until even into the dee p 
night. 



DESE WELLESLEY CARRY-ALLS. 

"Yes, sah. I'se bin up heah in de Noth foh a long time, sah, but 
I'se nevah seen de likes ob dese heah Wesley 'carry-all's, dat ap- 
proches de limit an' yet, is alius infintesmal in de capacity ob deh 
commodjousness. De drivahs ob dese heah conveyances is suah- 
ly public spihited an' cain't refuse nobody entrance to dese trav- 
'lin' rockin' chaihs. Ev'ah thing is dun foh de comfot ob de pas- 
sengahs. Eben free tobogginin rides is guanteed when foh folks 
'11 lay on de laps ob de eight dat is comfotably situated in de ve- 
hicle dat's made foh foh. Lawsy, lawsy, it's bettah dan a pos- 
sum hunt to see one ob dem rigs comin' plunkety-plunk round de 
conah an' all de gals a screamin' an' a slidin'. Dose on de top ob 
de heap gets a stahted an' dey come a whizzin' down the incline 
ob laps like a ole gent on a 'nana peel. If dah is any objecshuns 
to tobogginin, de whole load kin be kep' waitin' by de pehson 
dat'U go to de book stoah foh glue, foh de puhpose of transfixiza- 
tion, providin' a extra chage ob de mod'rate sum ob ten cents a 
minute is extracted by de drivah for de delay. (Den's de time 
dat de gal 'd ratheh be de drivah dan who she am, foh I reckon 
she hates powful bad to pay out de coppahs dat she's tendahly 
sabin foh heh washin' bill.) De grate thing 'bout dese heah 'car- 
ry-alls' is, dat deh is so easy ridin' an' so caihfully driben. Why, 
deh is driben wid such caih dat de chickens an' de ducks get out 
ob de way, so drunk is dey wid envy an' respec' at de wondah ob 
de dribin'. Yes, sah, dese heah 'carry-alls' is doin' righteous 
work, 'cause de occupints is alius on de road to Heben or de un- 
detakeh while dey's in 'em an' such jogglin' an' shakin' ob con- 
science as de occupints get, I reckon ain't gwine to hut no body. " 

L. R. B., 1907. 



LUNCHEON. 
Nelson L.Martin OAK GROVE CREAMERY CO. 

445 Boylston Street, Boston, Mass. 

Everything we serve In our Dining Room is the oholoest and b«9t 
that can be bought, regardless oi price. 



F\ I-I. PORTER, 

Plumber. 

TIN AND SHEET IRON WORK 

Ibot TMater ano Steam Heaters, 

Sealer In Stoves, Iflanijes, HarDware, 

paints, ails, Etc. 

Wellesley, Mass. 



Established 1875. 

Chas. E. Shattuck, 
GROCER, 

Wellssley Jquart, 



Qassius AV Hall, 

Successor to A. B. Clark, 

THE GROCER, 

Washington St., Wellesley. 



B. S. COLE, 

Mutton, Lamb, Veal, Poultry 

and Game, 

Wholesale and Retail. 

Stalls 13 & 15 Faneuil Hall Market 

Tel. Connection. BOSTON 



F. A. Coolidge &Co., 

Dealers in 

Choice Meats & Provisions 

Washington St., Wellesley. 



J. TA1LBY & SON, 
FLORISTS, 

Wellesley, Opp. R. R. Station 

Orden by mall or otherwise 
promptly attended to. Con- 
nected by Telephone. 

HOLDEN'S STUDIO 

20 No. Ave., Natick, 

HIGH GRADE PORTRAITS. 

Connected by Telephone. 

R. F. EVANS, 

Painter and Decorator. 

Paper Hanging: and Tinting:. 

HU flDail ®rt>crs prompt!? attenScS to. 

P. O. BOX 66. 

458 Washington Street, Wellesley. 

The Attention 

that we give to details is the secret 
of our superior work. May we have 
a trial package from you? 

People's Steam Laundry, 

Natlok:, IM«3». 

F. L. Cui'PLis, Pbop. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



ALUMNA NOTES. 



The Committee on the Nomination of an Alumnae Trustee 
announce the following resull of the preliminary ballot: 

II E u:\ M-. w E I r VOUNG, '84, received 97 votes, 
HARRIET L. MERRI IW, '86, " 63 

ELIZABETH SLATER ROGERS, "88, " io, 
MARTHA P. CONANT, '00, " 177 

BERTHA PALMER LANE, '91, " 206 

HELEN EAGER SWETT, '93, " 171 " 

These names of the two candidates receiving the highesl 
number >>r votes appear on the official ballot, which Ikis now 
been issued, as candidates for final election, 1 )u1 of about 1 ,Xoo 
preliminary ballots mailed to voters only 817 were returned. 
The Committee earnestly hopes that a fuller vote may be cast 
on this linal ballot which should l«- returned before June 1. In 
case any alumna? who arc- eligible to vote have failed to receive 
tin- official ballot they may obtain copies by applying to the 
chairman of the committee. Miss Ellen L. Burrell, Wcllesley, 
Mass 

On Saturday afternoon, April 9th, the Colorado Wellesley 
Club joined with the Colorado Branch of the Association of Col- 
legiate Alumna- in presenting "She Stoops to Conquer," to an 
audience of ladies. The cast was drawn from the members of 
the A. C. A., while the Wellesley Club undertook the business 
management of the affair. The play was a success both from 
the dramatic and the financial standpoints, and the proceeds 
of nearly Si 50 were divided equally between the two clubs. The 
A. C. A. is to contribute its share to the Neighborhood House — 
Dewrer's recently established social settlement — while the 
Wellesley Club gives $50 to the Alice Freeman Palmer Memorial 
Fund and a smaller sum to the Wenekenbach Memorial. The 
Wellesley girls who acted as ushers were Misses Anna L. Johnson, 
1SS1-18S2, Florence R. Parsons, 1901-1903, Laura E. Cornell, 
1889. 1S90, Julia D. Ferris, 18S9, Georgine Fraser, 1890, Ethelyn 
Price, 1897, Blanche Emmons, 1903, Carol Kramer, 1901-1903, 
Helen Wagner, formerly of 1905. The ushers and the Girls' 
Glee Club of Denver University who sang between the acts ap- 
pealed in cap and gown. The parts were taken as follows: 
Sir Charles Marlow. .Mrs. Mina Stone Gabriel, Wisconsin, 1885 

Yourg Marlow Miss Alice L. Havens, Vassar, 1000 

Hardcastle Mrs. Lydia M. Ward, Wisconsin 

Hastings Miss Helen L. Atkins, Wellesley, 1897 

Tong Sumpkin Miss A. Grace Wirt, Syracuse, 1884 

Piggory Miss Alice B. Saville, Vassar, 1900 

Stingo Miss Edna F. Hendrie, Radcliffe, 1901 

Mrs. Hardcastle. . Mrs. Cornelia Park. Knaekel, Wellesley, 1896 

Miss Hardcastle Miss Mabel C. Kennedy, Vassar, 1902 

Miss Neville Mrs. Florence Ballance Stevens, Vassar, 1896 

Servants and others, Mrs. May Tower Bigelow, Nebraska, 1889, 
Miss Gertrude Vaile, Vassar, 1900, Miss Edna W. Collins, Smith 
1 90 1. 

Mrs. Caroline Soule Metcalf, 1880, who has been living in 
Leipsic this winter, has recently spent some time traveling in 
Sicily and Greece. 

Mrs. Mary Hawley Briggs, 1892, who died in Kobe, Japan, 
on April 2d, went to Japan as a teacher in 1895 and remained 
there six years. She was in this country in 1901 and the next 
year married Rev. Francis G. Briggs, who was also a missionary. 

Miss Louise B. Richardson, 1 891- 1894 has been elected presi- 
dent of the Wellesley Hills Woman's Club. 

Miss Marion L. Taylor, 1895, is planning to take some graduate 
work in German at the University of Chicago this summer. She 
has recently accepted a position for the coming year at Tudor 
Hall, Indianapolis. 

Miss Edna E. Rounds, 1901, is teaching in Des Moines, Iowa. 

Miss Anne K. Edwards, 1901, has been spending the winter 
and spring at Winter Park, Florida. 

Miss Marion Patterson, 1901, has accepted a position in the 
Buffalo Public Library. 

Miss Elizabeth Blakeslee, 1901, expects to take a course in 
Geology at the Harvard Summer School this coming summer. 

Miss Florence Root, formerly of 1902, is studying Spanish at 
her home in Denver, Colorado, 

Miss Elizabeth R. Campbell, 1902, has been appointed by the 
Presbyterian Board of Foreign Missions to a station in Tokyo, 
Japan. She expects 

MARRIAGES. 

McNeill — Webber. At Holyoke, Massachusetts, May 3, 1904, 
Miss Grace Webber, 1890-1893, to Mr. George Scranton McNeill, 

DEATHS. 

In Denver, Colorado, January 18, 1904, Charles M. Hawkes, 
father of Susanna Whitney Hawkes, 1889. 

At Lovell. Maine, April 4, 1904, John F. Hobbs, father of 
Charlotte Elizabeth Hobbs, 1902. 

At Kobe, Japan, April 28, 1904, Mrs. Mary Hawley Briggs, 



Have you bought your Graduation 
Gown ? 

Remember HATCH'S Silks and 
Crepes. 

Looking for something for the Gar- 
den Party ? 

Don't forget our Japanese effects. 

HATCH'S, 

43 ano 45 Summer St., Boston. 

KNIGHTS' LINING STORE 

(E. R. Knights & Co.) 
Among our specialties for the present season are : 
SHIRT WAIST PATTERNS IN EMBROIDERED LINEN 
NECKWEAR in many of our own designs, which we pro- 
duce in our own workrooms ; not to be found in every other 
store. 

PETTICOATS and DROP SKIRTS ready to wear or made 
to measure in Silk, Mohair, Moreen and other materials. 

KNIGHTS' LINING STORE 

174- Tremont Street, Boston 

SM VTH B 

383 BOYLSTON STREET 

BOSTOIN 
Telephone, 1426-3 Back Bay 

Madame : — 

MOHAIR NOVELTIES 

FOR 

STREET SUITS 

RIDING HABITS 

IN LINEN AND CLOTH 

SILK SHIRTWAIST SUITS 

TUB SUITS 

OF LINEN AND CRASH 

AND 

Shirtwaists to Order 

W. H. SMYTHE 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY NOTES. 



At a recent Wednesday evening meeting, Miss Hazard spoke 
to the Phi Sigma Society of the interest and significance of local 
tradition and story, and of the beauty in the simple surrounding 
aspects of nature. Miss Hazard also read a number of her own 
poems, some concerned with nature, some embodying the 
ancient and beautiful stories of her home, Rhode Island. 

At a regular meeting of the Phi Sigma Society, May 4, the 
following program was presented: 

Hermann Sudermann Amy Gurlitz 

"Magda" Discussion and Readings Sue Sehoolfield 

"John the Baptist" Claire Sampson 



The Agora held its regular monthly meeting Wednesday even- 
ing, May 4th. The impromptu speeches were: 

I. The Labor Trouble in Colorado, 

Florence W. Hutsinpillar, 
Estelle C. Kramer, 
Ruth B. Abbott, 
Frances Rousmaniere. 

II. The Work of Congress in its last session, 

Helen Daniels, 
Ray Tyler, 
Martha N. Brooks. 

III. Our New Possession in the Panama Canal Region: — How 
we obtained it, and the Government proposed for it. After the 
speeches the Society listened to a debate on the question, 

Resolved: — That it would be for the best interests of 
civilization if Japan should win in the struggle. 

AFFIRMATIVE. NEGATIVE. 

Mary P. Eaton Marion Bosworth 

Nina D. Gage Fannie Field 

Faith Sturtevant Helen R. Button 

The result of the voting was in favor of the affirmative. 



The members of Alpha Kappa Chi celebrated the birthday of 
the society on Wednesday evening, May 4, 1904. 
The following program was given: 

Music Daisy G. Dutcher 

The Roman Library Beulah Johnson 

Roman Writing Materials, 

Tablets Lucy Bishop 

Papyrus and Inks ; Ellen Manchester 

Rolls and Reading Winifred Hawkridge 

Music Ethel Jordan 

Among those present were, Florence Hamilton 1900, Alice 
Rowe, 1900, Florence Smith, 1900, Marcia Mclntire, 1902, Rosa- 
mond Clark, 1903, Marjorie Nickerson, 1903. 



THEATRICAL NOTES. 



Colonial — Nance O'Neil in "Camille," Thursday evening; on 
Friday, " Fires of St. John;" Saturday matinee, "Magda;" 
Saturday evening, "Macbeth." 

Hollis — Wilton Lackaye in "The Pit." 

Globe— "The Isle of Spice." 

Park — Bernard Shaw's "Candida." 

Boston — "Babes in Toyland. " 

Tremont — "Woodland, A Forest Fantasy." 



HERRICK'S, 

COPLEY SQUARE, NEAR BACK BAY POST-OFFICE, 

BEST TICKETS FOR ALL THE THEATRES. 

Phone now 3329, 2330 and 2331. 



Chickerino- Pianos 

o 

The OLDEST in AMERICA : 
THE BEST in the WORLD 



Chickering &? Sons 



iOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



G. WMIS SMIIH 

SHIRT WAISTS 




158 Tremont Street, Boston 



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PARTRIDGE 
Class Photographer, 1904 



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